Do You Need Ovarian Cyst Surgery?

Do You Need Ovarian Cyst Surgery?
Do You Need Ovarian Cyst Surgery?

I've been told that surgery could help me, but I'm unsure about the risks...

I've been told that surgery could help me, but I'm unsure about the risks...

When is ovarian cyst surgery appropriate?

Not everyone is a candidate for ovarian cyst removal surgery. It's generally only undertaken in severe cases where a woman wishes to become pregnant and where weight loss and hormone treatment have not regulated or stimulated ovulation.

What is the procedure?

The most common form of surgery for PCOS is 'laparoscopic ovarian drilling'. This involves inserting a camera into the abdomen through a small incision close to the belly button. The cavity is expanded using gas so there is room to see and to manoeuvre. Next, a special instrument  is inserted and used to burn away damaged parts of the ovaries. This hopefully triggers natural ovulation. Scarring is minimal.

What are the risks with ovarian cyst surgery

There is an element of risk involved in every kind of surgery. Here are the 5 more serious possible complications of laparoscopic ovarian drilling:

  1. Internal scarring or adhesions – caused by damage to delicate tissue from the incision and tools inserted. This can lead to continued discomfort later, especially if the scar tissue becomes thick and hard.
  2. Damage to internal organs – caused by accidental cuts or abrasions during the procedure.
  3. Infection or bleeding as with any surgery, where there is an incision there is always the possibility of infection and or excessive bleeding around the entrance site.
  4. Internal bleeding – this may be caused while inserting or removing the equipment, or by accidental cuts to internal tissues.
  5. Pain – pain and bloating may be experienced due to the inflation of the lower abdomen area with gas during the procedure, though this should subside.

Do the risks outweigh the benefits?

This is a question which can only be answered on an individual case by case basis. Obviously, if you are overweight and a smoker and or drinker, there will always be higher risks attached to any kind of surgery so this is a great place to start, plus often weight loss and abstinence from toxins does help naturally with the effects of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome - so you may eliminate your need for surgery altogether!